Database Commons

a catalog of biological databases

e.g., animal; RNA; Methylation; China

Database information

SRA (Sequence Read Archive)

General information

Description: SRA makes biological sequence data available to the research community to enhance reproducibility and allow for new discoveries by comparing data sets.
Year founded: 2011
Last update: 2019
Version: v1.0
Accessibility:
Manual:
Accessible
Real time : Checking...
Country/Region: United States
Data type:
Data object:
Database category:
Major organism:
Keywords:

Contact information

University/Institution: National Center for Biotechnology Information
Address: Building 38A, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA
City: Bethesda
Province/State: MD
Country/Region: United States
Contact name (PI/Team): Eric W. Sayers
Contact email (PI/Helpdesk): sayers@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Related Database

Record metadata

Created on: 2015-06-20
Curated by:
Lina Ma [2019-04-21]
Lina Ma [2018-07-24]
Lina Ma [2017-08-22]
Lina Ma [2017-08-04]
Lin Xia [2016-03-28]
Mengwei Li [2016-02-21]
Mengwei Li [2016-02-19]
Lin Xia [2015-11-20]
Lin Xia [2015-06-28]

Ranking

All databases:
89/4549 (98.066%)
Raw bio-data:
6/451 (98.891%)
89
Total Rank
790
Citations
87.778
z-index

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Word cloud

Publications

22009675
The Sequence Read Archive: explosive growth of sequencing data. [PMID: 22009675]
Kodama Y, Shumway M, Leinonen R, International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration.

New generation sequencing platforms are producing data with significantly higher throughput and lower cost. A portion of this capacity is devoted to individual and community scientific projects. As these projects reach publication, raw sequencing datasets are submitted into the primary next-generation sequence data archive, the Sequence Read Archive (SRA). Archiving experimental data is the key to the progress of reproducible science. The SRA was established as a public repository for next-generation sequence data as a part of the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). INSDC is composed of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ). The SRA is accessible at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra from NCBI, at www.ebi.ac.uk/ena from EBI and at trace.ddbj.nig.ac.jp from DDBJ. In this article, we present the content and structure of the SRA and report on updated metadata structures, submission file formats and supported sequencing platforms. We also briefly outline our various responses to the challenge of explosive data growth.

Nucleic Acids Res. 2012:40(Database issue) | 297 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2020-02-08)
21062823
The sequence read archive. [PMID: 21062823]
Leinonen R, Sugawara H, Shumway M, International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration.

The combination of significantly lower cost and increased speed of sequencing has resulted in an explosive growth of data submitted into the primary next-generation sequence data archive, the Sequence Read Archive (SRA). The preservation of experimental data is an important part of the scientific record, and increasing numbers of journals and funding agencies require that next-generation sequence data are deposited into the SRA. The SRA was established as a public repository for the next-generation sequence data and is operated by the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). INSDC partners include the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ). The SRA is accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Traces/sra from NCBI, at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena from EBI and at http://trace.ddbj.nig.ac.jp from DDBJ. In this article, we present the content and structure of the SRA, detail our support for sequencing platforms and provide recommended data submission levels and formats. We also briefly outline our response to the challenge of data growth.

Nucleic Acids Res. 2011:39(Database issue) | 493 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2020-02-08)