UCSC Genome Browser Edit

Citations: 9974

z-index: 586.71

Basic information
Short name UCSC Genome Browser
Full name University of California Santa Cruz Genome Browser Database
Description Launched in 2001 to showcase the draft human genome assembly, the UCSC Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and associated tools continue to grow, providing a comprehensive resource of genome assemblies and annotations to scientists and students worldwide.
URL https://genome.ucsc.edu
Year founded 2000
Last update & version 2018-02-13
Accessibility Accessible
Contact information

The contact information is provided to facilitate update of database information, and it is curated based on the contact details in the database or the related publications. To ensure effective contact with database constructors, we give priority to the contact details in the database.

University/Institution University of California Santa Cruz
Address Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
City Santa Cruz
Province/State CA
Country/Region United States
Contact name (PI/Team) Cath Tyner
Contact email (PI/Helpdesk) cath@ucsc.edu
Data information
Data object
Data type
Database category
Major organism
Keyword
Publications
  • The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2019 update. [PMID: 30407534]
    Maximilian Haeussler, Ann S Zweig, Cath Tyner, Matthew L Speir, Kate R Rosenbloom, Brian J Raney, Christopher M Lee, Brian T Lee, Angie S Hinrichs, Jairo Navarro Gonzalez, David Gibson, Mark Diekhans, Hiram Clawson, Jonathan Casper, Galt P Barber, David Haussler, Robert M Kuhn, W James Kent

    The UCSC Genome Browser (https://genome.ucsc.edu) is a graphical viewer for exploring genome annotations. For almost two decades, the Browser has provided visualization tools for genetics and molecular biology and continues to add new data and features. This year, we added a new tool that lets users interactively arrange existing graphing tracks into new groups. Other software additions include new formats for chromosome interactions, a ChIP-Seq peak display for track hubs and improved support for HGVS. On the annotation side, we have added gnomAD, TCGA expression, RefSeq Functional elements, GTEx eQTLs, CRISPR Guides, SNPpedia and created a 30-way primate alignment on the human genome. Nine assemblies now have RefSeq-mapped gene models.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2019:47(D1)

    1 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-08)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2018 update. [PMID: 29106570]
    Jonathan Casper, Ann S Zweig, Chris Villarreal, Cath Tyner, Matthew L Speir, Kate R Rosenbloom, Brian J Raney, Christopher M Lee, Brian T Lee, Donna Karolchik, Angie S Hinrichs, Maximilian Haeussler, Luvina Guruvadoo, Jairo Navarro Gonzalez, David Gibson, Ian T Fiddes, Christopher Eisenhart, Mark Diekhans, Hiram Clawson, Galt P Barber, Joel Armstrong, David Haussler, Robert M Kuhn, W James Kent

    The UCSC Genome Browser (https://genome.ucsc.edu) provides a web interface for exploring annotated genome assemblies. The assemblies and annotation tracks are updated on an ongoing basis-12 assemblies and more than 28 tracks were added in the past year. Two recent additions are a display of CRISPR/Cas9 guide sequences and an interactive navigator for gene interactions. Other upgrades from the past year include a command-line version of the Variant Annotation Integrator, support for Human Genome Variation Society variant nomenclature input and output, and a revised highlighting tool that now supports multiple simultaneous regions and colors.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2018:46(D1)

    78 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2017 update. [PMID: 27899642]
    Cath Tyner, Galt P Barber, Jonathan Casper, Hiram Clawson, Mark Diekhans, Christopher Eisenhart, Clayton M Fischer, David Gibson, Jairo Navarro Gonzalez, Luvina Guruvadoo, Maximilian Haeussler, Steve Heitner, Angie S Hinrichs, Donna Karolchik, Brian T Lee, Christopher M Lee, Parisa Nejad, Brian J Raney, Kate R Rosenbloom, Matthew L Speir, Chris Villarreal, John Vivian, Ann S Zweig, David Haussler, Robert M Kuhn, W James Kent

    Since its 2001 debut, the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) team has provided continuous support to the international genomics and biomedical communities through a web-based, open source platform designed for the fast, scalable display of sequence alignments and annotations landscaped against a vast collection of quality reference genome assemblies. The browser's publicly accessible databases are the backbone of a rich, integrated bioinformatics tool suite that includes a graphical interface for data queries and downloads, alignment programs, command-line utilities and more. This year's highlights include newly designed home and gateway pages; a new 'multi-region' track display configuration for exon-only, gene-only and custom regions visualization; new genome browsers for three species (brown kiwi, crab-eating macaque and Malayan flying lemur); eight updated genome assemblies; extended support for new data types such as CRAM, RNA-seq expression data and long-range chromatin interaction pairs; and the unveiling of a new supported mirror site in Japan. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2017:45(D1)

    103 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2016 update. [PMID: 26590259]
    Matthew L Speir, Ann S Zweig, Kate R Rosenbloom, Brian J Raney, Benedict Paten, Parisa Nejad, Brian T Lee, Katrina Learned, Donna Karolchik, Angie S Hinrichs, Steve Heitner, Rachel A Harte, Maximilian Haeussler, Luvina Guruvadoo, Pauline A Fujita, Christopher Eisenhart, Mark Diekhans, Hiram Clawson, Jonathan Casper, Galt P Barber, David Haussler, Robert M Kuhn, W James Kent

    For the past 15 years, the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) has served the international research community by offering an integrated platform for viewing and analyzing information from a large database of genome assemblies and their associated annotations. The UCSC Genome Browser has been under continuous development since its inception with new data sets and software features added frequently. Some release highlights of this year include new and updated genome browsers for various assemblies, including bonobo and zebrafish; new gene annotation sets; improvements to track and assembly hub support; and a new interactive tool, the "Data Integrator", for intersecting data from multiple tracks. We have greatly expanded the data sets available on the most recent human assembly, hg38/GRCh38, to include updated gene prediction sets from GENCODE, more phenotype- and disease-associated variants from ClinVar and ClinGen, more genomic regulatory data, and a new multiple genome alignment. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2016:44(D1)

    182 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2015 update. [PMID: 25428374]
    Kate R Rosenbloom, Joel Armstrong, Galt P Barber, Jonathan Casper, Hiram Clawson, Mark Diekhans, Timothy R Dreszer, Pauline A Fujita, Luvina Guruvadoo, Maximilian Haeussler, Rachel A Harte, Steve Heitner, Glenn Hickey, Angie S Hinrichs, Robert Hubley, Donna Karolchik, Katrina Learned, Brian T Lee, Chin H Li, Karen H Miga, Ngan Nguyen, Benedict Paten, Brian J Raney, Arian F A Smit, Matthew L Speir, Ann S Zweig, David Haussler, Robert M Kuhn, W James Kent

    Launched in 2001 to showcase the draft human genome assembly, the UCSC Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and associated tools continue to grow, providing a comprehensive resource of genome assemblies and annotations to scientists and students worldwide. Highlights of the past year include the release of a browser for the first new human genome reference assembly in 4 years in December 2013 (GRCh38, UCSC hg38), a watershed comparative genomics annotation (100-species multiple alignment and conservation) and a novel distribution mechanism for the browser (GBiB: Genome Browser in a Box). We created browsers for new species (Chinese hamster, elephant shark, minke whale), 'mined the web' for DNA sequences and expanded the browser display with stacked color graphs and region highlighting. As our user community increasingly adopts the UCSC track hub and assembly hub representations for sharing large-scale genomic annotation data sets and genome sequencing projects, our menu of public data hubs has tripled. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2015:43(Database issue)

    411 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2014 update. [PMID: 24270787]
    Donna Karolchik, Galt P Barber, Jonathan Casper, Hiram Clawson, Melissa S Cline, Mark Diekhans, Timothy R Dreszer, Pauline A Fujita, Luvina Guruvadoo, Maximilian Haeussler, Rachel A Harte, Steve Heitner, Angie S Hinrichs, Katrina Learned, Brian T Lee, Chin H Li, Brian J Raney, Brooke Rhead, Kate R Rosenbloom, Cricket A Sloan, Matthew L Speir, Ann S Zweig, David Haussler, Robert M Kuhn, W James Kent

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) offers online public access to a growing database of genomic sequence and annotations for a large collection of organisms, primarily vertebrates, with an emphasis on the human and mouse genomes. The Browser's web-based tools provide an integrated environment for visualizing, comparing, analysing and sharing both publicly available and user-generated genomic data sets. As of September 2013, the database contained genomic sequence and a basic set of annotation 'tracks' for ?90 organisms. Significant new annotations include a 60-species multiple alignment conservation track on the mouse, updated UCSC Genes tracks for human and mouse, and several new sets of variation and ENCODE data. New software tools include a Variant Annotation Integrator that returns predicted functional effects of a set of variants uploaded as a custom track, an extension to UCSC Genes that displays haplotype alleles for protein-coding genes and an expansion of data hubs that includes the capability to display remotely hosted user-provided assembly sequence in addition to annotation data. To improve European access, we have added a Genome Browser mirror (http://genome-euro.ucsc.edu) hosted at Bielefeld University in Germany.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2014:42(Database issue)

    411 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser database: extensions and updates 2013. [PMID: 23155063]
    Laurence R Meyer, Ann S Zweig, Angie S Hinrichs, Donna Karolchik, Robert M Kuhn, Matthew Wong, Cricket A Sloan, Kate R Rosenbloom, Greg Roe, Brooke Rhead, Brian J Raney, Andy Pohl, Venkat S Malladi, Chin H Li, Brian T Lee, Katrina Learned, Vanessa Kirkup, Fan Hsu, Steve Heitner, Rachel A Harte, Maximilian Haeussler, Luvina Guruvadoo, Mary Goldman, Belinda M Giardine, Pauline A Fujita, Timothy R Dreszer, Mark Diekhans, Melissa S Cline, Hiram Clawson, Galt P Barber, David Haussler, W James Kent

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) offers online public access to a growing database of genomic sequence and annotations for a wide variety of organisms. The Browser is an integrated tool set for visualizing, comparing, analysing and sharing both publicly available and user-generated genomic datasets. As of September 2012, genomic sequence and a basic set of annotation 'tracks' are provided for 63 organisms, including 26 mammals, 13 non-mammal vertebrates, 3 invertebrate deuterostomes, 13 insects, 6 worms, yeast and sea hare. In the past year 19 new genome assemblies have been added, and we anticipate releasing another 28 in early 2013. Further, a large number of annotation tracks have been either added, updated by contributors or remapped to the latest human reference genome. Among these are an updated UCSC Genes track for human and mouse assemblies. We have also introduced several features to improve usability, including new navigation menus. This article provides an update to the UCSC Genome Browser database, which has been previously featured in the Database issue of this journal.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2013:41(Database issue)

    475 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser database: extensions and updates 2011. [PMID: 22086951]
    Timothy R Dreszer, Donna Karolchik, Ann S Zweig, Angie S Hinrichs, Brian J Raney, Robert M Kuhn, Laurence R Meyer, Mathew Wong, Cricket A Sloan, Kate R Rosenbloom, Greg Roe, Brooke Rhead, Andy Pohl, Venkat S Malladi, Chin H Li, Katrina Learned, Vanessa Kirkup, Fan Hsu, Rachel A Harte, Luvina Guruvadoo, Mary Goldman, Belinda M Giardine, Pauline A Fujita, Mark Diekhans, Melissa S Cline, Hiram Clawson, Galt P Barber, David Haussler, W James Kent

    The University of California Santa Cruz Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) offers online public access to a growing database of genomic sequence and annotations for a wide variety of organisms. The Browser is an integrated tool set for visualizing, comparing, analyzing and sharing both publicly available and user-generated genomic data sets. In the past year, the local database has been updated with four new species assemblies, and we anticipate another four will be released by the end of 2011. Further, a large number of annotation tracks have been either added, updated by contributors, or remapped to the latest human reference genome. Among these are new phenotype and disease annotations, UCSC genes, and a major dbSNP update, which required new visualization methods. Growing beyond the local database, this year we have introduced 'track data hubs', which allow the Genome Browser to provide access to remotely located sets of annotations. This feature is designed to significantly extend the number and variety of annotation tracks that are publicly available for visualization and analysis from within our site. We have also introduced several usability features including track search and a context-sensitive menu of options available with a right-click anywhere on the Browser's image.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2012:40(Database issue)

    221 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser database: update 2011. [PMID: 20959295]
    Pauline A Fujita, Brooke Rhead, Ann S Zweig, Angie S Hinrichs, Donna Karolchik, Melissa S Cline, Mary Goldman, Galt P Barber, Hiram Clawson, Antonio Coelho, Mark Diekhans, Timothy R Dreszer, Belinda M Giardine, Rachel A Harte, Jennifer Hillman-Jackson, Fan Hsu, Vanessa Kirkup, Robert M Kuhn, Katrina Learned, Chin H Li, Laurence R Meyer, Andy Pohl, Brian J Raney, Kate R Rosenbloom, Kayla E Smith, David Haussler, W James Kent

    The University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) offers online access to a database of genomic sequence and annotation data for a wide variety of organisms. The Browser also has many tools for visualizing, comparing and analyzing both publicly available and user-generated genomic data sets, aligning sequences and uploading user data. Among the features released this year are a gene search tool and annotation track drag-reorder functionality as well as support for BAM and BigWig/BigBed file formats. New display enhancements include overlay of multiple wiggle tracks through use of transparent coloring, options for displaying transformed wiggle data, a 'mean+whiskers' windowing function for display of wiggle data at high zoom levels, and more color schemes for microarray data. New data highlights include seven new genome assemblies, a Neandertal genome data portal, phenotype and disease association data, a human RNA editing track, and a zebrafish Conservation track. We also describe updates to existing tracks.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2011:39(Database issue)

    641 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser database: update 2010. [PMID: 19906737]
    Brooke Rhead, Donna Karolchik, Robert M Kuhn, Angie S Hinrichs, Ann S Zweig, Pauline A Fujita, Mark Diekhans, Kayla E Smith, Kate R Rosenbloom, Brian J Raney, Andy Pohl, Michael Pheasant, Laurence R Meyer, Katrina Learned, Fan Hsu, Jennifer Hillman-Jackson, Rachel A Harte, Belinda Giardine, Timothy R Dreszer, Hiram Clawson, Galt P Barber, David Haussler, W James Kent

    The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser website (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) provides a large database of publicly available sequence and annotation data along with an integrated tool set for examining and comparing the genomes of organisms, aligning sequence to genomes, and displaying and sharing users' own annotation data. As of September 2009, genomic sequence and a basic set of annotation 'tracks' are provided for 47 organisms, including 14 mammals, 10 non-mammal vertebrates, 3 invertebrate deuterostomes, 13 insects, 6 worms and a yeast. New data highlights this year include an updated human genome browser, a 44-species multiple sequence alignment track, improved variation and phenotype tracks and 16 new genome-wide ENCODE tracks. New features include drag-and-zoom navigation, a Wiki track for user-added annotations, new custom track formats for large datasets (bigBed and bigWig), a new multiple alignment output tool, links to variation and protein structure tools, in silico PCR utility enhancements, and improved track configuration tools.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2010:38(Database issue)

    390 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser Database: update 2009. [PMID: 18996895]
    R M Kuhn, D Karolchik, A S Zweig, T Wang, K E Smith, K R Rosenbloom, B Rhead, B J Raney, A Pohl, M Pheasant, L Meyer, F Hsu, A S Hinrichs, R A Harte, B Giardine, P Fujita, M Diekhans, T Dreszer, H Clawson, G P Barber, D Haussler, W J Kent

    The UCSC Genome Browser Database (GBD, http://genome.ucsc.edu) is a publicly available collection of genome assembly sequence data and integrated annotations for a large number of organisms, including extensive comparative-genomic resources. In the past year, 13 new genome assemblies have been added, including two important primate species, orangutan and marmoset, bringing the total to 46 assemblies for 24 different vertebrates and 39 assemblies for 22 different invertebrate animals. The GBD datasets may be viewed graphically with the UCSC Genome Browser, which uses a coordinate-based display system allowing users to juxtapose a wide variety of data. These data include all mRNAs from GenBank mapped to all organisms, RefSeq alignments, gene predictions, regulatory elements, gene expression data, repeats, SNPs and other variation data, as well as pairwise and multiple-genome alignments. A variety of other bioinformatics tools are also provided, including BLAT, the Table Browser, the Gene Sorter, the Proteome Browser, VisiGene and Genome Graphs.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2009:37(Database issue)

    247 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser Database: 2008 update. [PMID: 18086701]
    D Karolchik, R M Kuhn, R Baertsch, G P Barber, H Clawson, M Diekhans, B Giardine, R A Harte, A S Hinrichs, F Hsu, K M Kober, W Miller, J S Pedersen, A Pohl, B J Raney, B Rhead, K R Rosenbloom, K E Smith, M Stanke, A Thakkapallayil, H Trumbower, T Wang, A S Zweig, D Haussler, W J Kent

    The University of California, Santa Cruz, Genome Browser Database (GBD) provides integrated sequence and annotation data for a large collection of vertebrate and model organism genomes. Seventeen new assemblies have been added to the database in the past year, for a total coverage of 19 vertebrate and 21 invertebrate species as of September 2007. For each assembly, the GBD contains a collection of annotation data aligned to the genomic sequence. Highlights of this year's additions include a 28-species human-based vertebrate conservation annotation, an enhanced UCSC Genes set, and more human variation, MGC, and ENCODE data. The database is optimized for fast interactive performance with a set of web-based tools that may be used to view, manipulate, filter and download the annotation data. New toolset features include the Genome Graphs tool for displaying genome-wide data sets, session saving and sharing, better custom track management, expanded Genome Browser configuration options and a Genome Browser wiki site. The downloadable GBD data, the companion Genome Browser toolset and links to documentation and related information can be found at: http://genome.ucsc.edu/.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2008:36(Database issue)

    360 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC genome browser database: update 2007. [PMID: 17142222]
    R M Kuhn, D Karolchik, A S Zweig, H Trumbower, D J Thomas, A Thakkapallayil, C W Sugnet, M Stanke, K E Smith, A Siepel, K R Rosenbloom, B Rhead, B J Raney, A Pohl, J S Pedersen, F Hsu, A S Hinrichs, R A Harte, M Diekhans, H Clawson, G Bejerano, G P Barber, R Baertsch, D Haussler, W J Kent

    The University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser Database contains, as of September 2006, sequence and annotation data for the genomes of 13 vertebrate and 19 invertebrate species. The Genome Browser displays a wide variety of annotations at all scales from the single nucleotide level up to a full chromosome and includes assembly data, genes and gene predictions, mRNA and EST alignments, and comparative genomics, regulation, expression and variation data. The database is optimized for fast interactive performance with web tools that provide powerful visualization and querying capabilities for mining the data. In the past year, 22 new assemblies and several new sets of human variation annotation have been released. New features include VisiGene, a fully integrated in situ hybridization image browser; phyloGif, for drawing evolutionary tree diagrams; a redesigned Custom Track feature; an expanded SNP annotation track; and many new display options. The Genome Browser, other tools, downloadable data files and links to documentation and other information can be found at http://genome.ucsc.edu/.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2007:35(Database issue)

    196 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • 28-way vertebrate alignment and conservation track in the UCSC Genome Browser. [PMID: 17984227]
    Webb Miller, Kate Rosenbloom, Ross C Hardison, Minmei Hou, James Taylor, Brian Raney, Richard Burhans, David C King, Robert Baertsch, Daniel Blankenberg, Sergei L Kosakovsky Pond, Anton Nekrutenko, Belinda Giardine, Robert S Harris, Svitlana Tyekucheva, Mark Diekhans, Thomas H Pringle, William J Murphy, Arthur Lesk, George M Weinstock, Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, Richard A Gibbs, Eric S Lander, Adam Siepel, David Haussler, W James Kent,

    This article describes a set of alignments of 28 vertebrate genome sequences that is provided by the UCSC Genome Browser. The alignments can be viewed on the Human Genome Browser (March 2006 assembly) at http://genome.ucsc.edu, downloaded in bulk by anonymous FTP from http://hgdownload.cse.ucsc.edu/goldenPath/hg18/multiz28way, or analyzed with the Galaxy server at http://g2.bx.psu.edu. This article illustrates the power of this resource for exploring vertebrate and mammalian evolution, using three examples. First, we present several vignettes involving insertions and deletions within protein-coding regions, including a look at some human-specific indels. Then we study the extent to which start codons and stop codons in the human sequence are conserved in other species, showing that start codons are in general more poorly conserved than stop codons. Finally, an investigation of the phylogenetic depth of conservation for several classes of functional elements in the human genome reveals striking differences in the rates and modes of decay in alignability. Each functional class has a distinctive period of stringent constraint, followed by decays that allow (for the case of regulatory regions) or reject (for coding regions and ultraconserved elements) insertions and deletions.

    Genome Res 2007:17(12)

    157 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser Database: update 2006. [PMID: 16381938]
    A S Hinrichs, D Karolchik, R Baertsch, G P Barber, G Bejerano, H Clawson, M Diekhans, T S Furey, R A Harte, F Hsu, J Hillman-Jackson, R M Kuhn, J S Pedersen, A Pohl, B J Raney, K R Rosenbloom, A Siepel, K E Smith, C W Sugnet, A Sultan-Qurraie, D J Thomas, H Trumbower, R J Weber, M Weirauch, A S Zweig, D Haussler, W J Kent

    The University of California Santa Cruz Genome Browser Database (GBD) contains sequence and annotation data for the genomes of about a dozen vertebrate species and several major model organisms. Genome annotations typically include assembly data, sequence composition, genes and gene predictions, mRNA and expressed sequence tag evidence, comparative genomics, regulation, expression and variation data. The database is optimized to support fast interactive performance with web tools that provide powerful visualization and querying capabilities for mining the data. The Genome Browser displays a wide variety of annotations at all scales from single nucleotide level up to a full chromosome. The Table Browser provides direct access to the database tables and sequence data, enabling complex queries on genome-wide datasets. The Proteome Browser graphically displays protein properties. The Gene Sorter allows filtering and comparison of genes by several metrics including expression data and several gene properties. BLAT and In Silico PCR search for sequences in entire genomes in seconds. These tools are highly integrated and provide many hyperlinks to other databases and websites. The GBD, browsing tools, downloadable data files and links to documentation and other information can be found at http://genome.ucsc.edu/.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2006:34(Database issue)

    385 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Proteome Browser. [PMID: 15608236]
    Fan Hsu, Tom H Pringle, Robert M Kuhn, Donna Karolchik, Mark Diekhans, David Haussler, W James Kent

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Proteome Browser provides a wealth of protein information presented in graphical images and with links to other protein-related Internet sites. The Proteome Browser is tightly integrated with the UCSC Genome Browser. For the first time, Genome Browser users have both the genome and proteome worlds at their fingertips simultaneously. The Proteome Browser displays tracks of protein and genomic sequences, exon structure, polarity, hydrophobicity, locations of cysteine and glycosylation potential, Superfamily domains and amino acids that deviate from normal abundance. Histograms show genome-wide distribution of protein properties, including isoelectric point, molecular weight, number of exons, InterPro domains and cysteine locations, together with specific property values of the selected protein. The Proteome Browser also provides links to gene annotations in the Genome Browser, the Known Genes details page and the Gene Sorter; domain information from Superfamily, InterPro and Pfam; three-dimensional structures at the Protein Data Bank and ModBase; and pathway data at KEGG, BioCarta/CGAP and BioCyc. As of August 2004, the Proteome Browser is available for human, mouse and rat proteomes. The browser may be accessed from any Known Genes details page of the Genome Browser at http://genome.ucsc.edu. A user's guide is also available on this website.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2005:33(Database issue)

    25 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Table Browser data retrieval tool. [PMID: 14681465]
    Donna Karolchik, Angela S Hinrichs, Terrence S Furey, Krishna M Roskin, Charles W Sugnet, David Haussler, W James Kent,

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Table Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/cgi-bin/hgText) provides text-based access to a large collection of genome assemblies and annotation data stored in the Genome Browser Database. A flexible alternative to the graphical-based Genome Browser, this tool offers an enhanced level of query support that includes restrictions based on field values, free-form SQL queries and combined queries on multiple tables. Output can be filtered to restrict the fields and lines returned, and may be organized into one of several formats, including a simple tab- delimited file that can be loaded into a spreadsheet or database as well as advanced formats that may be uploaded into the Genome Browser as custom annotation tracks. The Table Browser User's Guide located on the UCSC website provides instructions and detailed examples for constructing queries and configuring output.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2004:32(Database issue)

    875 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The UCSC Genome Browser Database. [PMID: 12519945]
    D Karolchik, R Baertsch, M Diekhans, T S Furey, A Hinrichs, Y T Lu, K M Roskin, M Schwartz, C W Sugnet, D J Thomas, R J Weber, D Haussler, W J Kent, null null

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser Database is an up to date source for genome sequence data integrated with a large collection of related annotations. The database is optimized to support fast interactive performance with the web-based UCSC Genome Browser, a tool built on top of the database for rapid visualization and querying of the data at many levels. The annotations for a given genome are displayed in the browser as a series of tracks aligned with the genomic sequence. Sequence data and annotations may also be viewed in a text-based tabular format or downloaded as tab-delimited flat files. The Genome Browser Database, browsing tools and downloadable data files can all be found on the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics website (http://genome.ucsc.edu), which also contains links to documentation and related technical information.

    Nucleic Acids Res 2003:31(1)

    894 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

  • The human genome browser at UCSC. [PMID: 12045153]
    W James Kent, Charles W Sugnet, Terrence S Furey, Krishna M Roskin, Tom H Pringle, Alan M Zahler, David Haussler

    As vertebrate genome sequences near completion and research refocuses to their analysis, the issue of effective genome annotation display becomes critical. A mature web tool for rapid and reliable display of any requested portion of the genome at any scale, together with several dozen aligned annotation tracks, is provided at http://genome.ucsc.edu. This browser displays assembly contigs and gaps, mRNA and expressed sequence tag alignments, multiple gene predictions, cross-species homologies, single nucleotide polymorphisms, sequence-tagged sites, radiation hybrid data, transposon repeats, and more as a stack of coregistered tracks. Text and sequence-based searches provide quick and precise access to any region of specific interest. Secondary links from individual features lead to sequence details and supplementary off-site databases. One-half of the annotation tracks are computed at the University of California, Santa Cruz from publicly available sequence data; collaborators worldwide provide the rest. Users can stably add their own custom tracks to the browser for educational or research purposes. The conceptual and technical framework of the browser, its underlying MYSQL database, and overall use are described. The web site currently serves over 50,000 pages per day to over 3000 different users.

    Genome Res 2002:12(6)

    3922 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-06-22)

Rank

  • Ranking in all databases: No. 7
  • Ranking in category/categories:
    • Gene genome and annotation: No. 6
The box plots depict Z-index distribution for all databases in Database Commons and for specific database category/categories. The red line indicates log2(Z-index) of UCSC Genome Browser.

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    • ***ina@***c.cn [2019-06-19]
    • ***d@***c.cn [2019-01-07]
    • ***ng***ng@***c.cn [2018-11-27]
    • ***ina@***c.cn [2018-05-28]
    • ***ina@***c.cn [2017-12-05]
    • ***shx@***c.cn [2017-02-17]
    • ***ng***ng@***c.cn [2016-08-10]
    • ***hy@***c.cn [2016-04-15]
    • ***hy@***c.cn [2016-03-31]
    • ***engwei@***63.com [2016-02-15]
    • ***lin@***c.cn [2016-01-29]
    • ***lin@***c.cn [2016-01-03]
    • ***lin@***c.cn [2016-01-02]
    • ***hy@***c.cn [2015-11-22]
    • ***hy@***c.cn [2015-06-26]

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