eHOMD Edit

Citations: 0

z-index: 0

Basic information
Short name eHOMD
Full name expanded Human Oral Microbiome Database
Description a comprehensive microbiome database for sites along the human aerodigestive tract.
URL http://www.ehomd.org
Year founded
Last update & version
Accessibility Accessible
Contact information

The contact information is provided to facilitate update of database information, and it is curated based on the contact details in the database or the related publications. To ensure effective contact with database constructors, we give priority to the contact details in the database.

University/Institution Forsyth Institute
Address
City
Province/State
Country/Region United States
Contact name (PI/Team) Floyd Dewhirst
Contact email (PI/Helpdesk) fdewhirst@forsyth.org
Data information
Data object
Data type
Database category
Major organism
Keyword
Publications
  • New Insights into Human Nostril Microbiome from the Expanded Human Oral Microbiome Database (eHOMD): a Resource for the Microbiome of the Human Aerodigestive Tract. [PMID: 30534599]
    Isabel F Escapa, Tsute Chen, Yanmei Huang, Prasad Gajare, Floyd E Dewhirst, Katherine P Lemon

    The expanded Human Oral Microbiome Database (eHOMD) is a comprehensive microbiome database for sites along the human aerodigestive tract that revealed new insights into the nostril microbiome. The eHOMD provides well-curated 16S rRNA gene reference sequences linked to available genomes and enables assignment of species-level taxonomy to most next-generation sequences derived from diverse aerodigestive tract sites, including the nasal passages, sinuses, throat, esophagus, and mouth. Using minimum entropy decomposition coupled with the RDP Classifier and our eHOMD V1-V3 training set, we reanalyzed 16S rRNA V1-V3 sequences from the nostrils of 210 Human Microbiome Project participants at the species level, revealing four key insights. First, we discovered that Lawsonella clevelandensis, a recently named bacterium, and [G-1] HMT-174, a previously unrecognized bacterium, are common in adult nostrils. Second, just 19 species accounted for 90% of the total sequences from all participants. Third, 1 of these 19 species belonged to a currently uncultivated genus. Fourth, for 94% of the participants, 2 to 10 species constituted 90% of their sequences, indicating that the nostril microbiome may be represented by limited consortia. These insights highlight the strengths of the nostril microbiome as a model system for studying interspecies interactions and microbiome function. Also, in this cohort, three common nasal species (Dolosigranulum pigrum and two species) showed positive differential abundance when the pathobiont Staphylococcus aureus was absent, generating hypotheses regarding colonization resistance. By facilitating species-level taxonomic assignment to microbes from the human aerodigestive tract, the eHOMD is a vital resource enhancing clinical relevance of microbiome studies. The eHOMD (http://www.ehomd.org) is a valuable resource for researchers, from basic to clinical, who study the microbiomes and the individual microbes in body sites in the human aerodigestive tract, which includes the nasal passages, sinuses, throat, esophagus, and mouth, and the lower respiratory tract, in health and disease. The eHOMD is an actively curated, web-based, open-access resource. eHOMD provides the following: (i) species-level taxonomy based on grouping 16S rRNA gene sequences at 98.5% identity, (ii) a systematic naming scheme for unnamed and/or uncultivated microbial taxa, (iii) reference genomes to facilitate metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and proteomic studies and (iv) convenient cross-links to other databases (e.g., PubMed and Entrez). By facilitating the assignment of species names to sequences, the eHOMD is a vital resource for enhancing the clinical relevance of 16S rRNA gene-based microbiome studies, as well as metagenomic studies.

    mSystems 2018:3(6)

    0 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2019-07-27)

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    • Gene genome and annotation: No. 0
The box plots depict Z-index distribution for all databases in Database Commons and for specific database category/categories. The red line indicates log2(Z-index) of eHOMD.

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Record metadata

  • Created on: 2019-01-04
    • ***ina@***c.cn [2019-01-23]
    • ***d@***c.cn [2019-01-12]
    • ***d@***c.cn [2019-01-12]
    • ***d@***c.cn [2019-01-04]

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