eVOC Edit

Citations: 110

z-index: 7.33

Basic information
Short name eVOC
Full name Controlled vocabularies for unifying gene expression data
Description We present here eVOC, a system which associates labelled target cDNAs for microarray experiments, or cDNA libraries and their associated transcripts with controlled terms in a set of hierarchical vocabularies.
URL http://www.sanbi.ac.za/evoc
Year founded
Last update & version
Availability Not Available
Contact information
University/Institution hosted The University of the Western Cape
Address South African National Bioinformatics Institute, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa.
City Bellville
Province/State
Country/Region South Africa
Contact name Winston Hide
Contact email winhide@sanbi.ac.za
Data information
Object(s)
  • Animal
Data type(s)
  • DNA
Data Category/Categories
  • Expression
  • Standard ontology and nomenclature
Major organism(s)
  • Homo sapiens
Keyword(s)
  • target cDNAs
  • microarray experiments
  • Expression data
Publications
  • Application of eVOC: controlled vocabularies for unifying gene expression data.[PMID: 14744118]
    Winston Hide, Damian Smedley, Mark McCarthy, Janet Kelso,

    To provide standardised description of gene expression and cross platform querying of databases, we have developed eVOC (http://www.sanbi.ac.za/evoc/), consisting of four orthogonal ontologies which describe Anatomical System, Cell Type, Pathology and Developmental Stage. We have annotated 47 microarray expression data sets and all publicly available human cDNA and SAGE tag libraries. eVOC has been integrated with the public resource EnsMart, which provides linking of transcripts and libraries with expression terms and the human genome sequence (http://www.ensembl.org/Homo_sapiens/martview).

    C. R. Biol. :326(10-11)

    5 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2018-08-17)

  • eVOC: a controlled vocabulary for unifying gene expression data.[PMID: 12799354]
    Janet Kelso, Johann Visagie, Gregory Theiler, Alan Christoffels, Soraya Bardien, Damian Smedley, Darren Otgaar, Gary Greyling, C Victor Jongeneel, Mark I McCarthy, Tania Hide, Winston Hide,

    Expression data contribute significantly to the biological value of the sequenced human genome, providing extensive information about gene structure and the pattern of gene expression. ESTs, together with SAGE libraries and microarray experiment information, provide a broad and rich view of the transcriptome. However, it is difficult to perform large-scale expression mining of the data generated by these diverse experimental approaches. Not only is the data stored in disparate locations, but there is frequent ambiguity in the meaning of terms used to describe the source of the material used in the experiment. Untangling semantic differences between the data provided by different resources is therefore largely reliant on the domain knowledge of a human expert. We present here eVOC, a system which associates labelled target cDNAs for microarray experiments, or cDNA libraries and their associated transcripts with controlled terms in a set of hierarchical vocabularies. eVOC consists of four orthogonal controlled vocabularies suitable for describing the domains of human gene expression data including Anatomical System, Cell Type, Pathology and Developmental Stage. We have curated and annotated 7016 cDNA libraries represented in dbEST, as well as 104 SAGE libraries,with expression information,and provide this as an integrated, public resource that allows the linking of transcripts and libraries with expression terms. Both the vocabularies and the vocabulary-annotated libraries can be retrieved from http://www.sanbi.ac.za/evoc/. Several groups are involved in developing this resource with the aim of unifying transcript expression information.

    Genome Res. 2003:13(6A)

    105 Citations (from Europe PMC, 2018-08-17)

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Record metadata

  • Created on: 2018-02-10
    • Ma Lina [2018-05-17]
    • Wang Qi [2018-02-23]
    • Zou Dong [2018-02-13]

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